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Noah Mokoush, Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach


Photo of Noah Mokoush

“We can make a difference by bringing the information we have learned back to the community,” shares Noah Mokoush. 

Over the years, Noah has been inspired to take on community education projects. Everything from local concerns about stray dogs to diabetes studies and environmental projects. He shows his care through his work. “I like helping people and I’m very passionate about the land, our culture and the people.”

Noah is a Water First Environmental Intern. He has been involved in a contaminant sampling program for heavy metals and fish population studies in Kawawachikamach. “I want the community to feel secure and show them that it’s okay to fish, but we have to be careful. I want to help the community make better choices.” 

His role as a community translator of traditional Naskapi has been helpful with the recent Water First food frequency questionnaire. Interns are collecting data on fish consumption and possible health risks due to heavy metals. “This will help us make more informed decisions about our diet,” Noah explains. 

At 28 years old, with a great sense of humour and a strong interest in learning, Noah has enjoyed the opportunity to connect with other Water First Interns. After attending a Water First workshop in Quebec City last fall, Noah shared, “I like that there were also people from different First Nation communities. They had different obstacles than us, but we got to learn and exchange ideas with them. I hope it will help to keep improving our restoration work.”